Au Pair Insurance

Au Pairs visiting and staying in the US on a exchange visa or a J1 visa must follow all the rules and requirements of their visa status. Health care costs in the US are extremely high and you do not want to be unprepared in the event you fall sick or injure yourself. Your J1 visa can also be revoked if you are found to be without valid, acceptable Au Pair Insurance. Insurance for Au Pairs is quite affordable, with plans available from $41 a month. These plans meet all the requirements and offer peace of mind during your stay […]

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J1 Visa Health Insurance

J1 Visa holders holders coming to the US have to show proof of health insurance to be granted a visa. The insurance for J1 visa holders must meet certain requirements set by the US State department. Sometimes the organization sponsoring the J1 visa can purchase J1 health insurance on behalf of the insured. In some cases, the J1 applicant may purchase the J1 visa insurance for themselves and their family. If the sponsoring organization purchases the insurance for the J1 visa holder, the dependants or J2 visa holders must purchase coverage that meets the J visa insurance requirements. In some […]

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How long can a visiting scholar stay in the US?

Most J-1 programs require a minimum stay of three weeks and allow a maximum stay of three years. One six-month extension can be given by the “sponsor” if the additional time is needed for the scholar to complete the purpose for which he or she originally came to the United States. In unusual circumstances and only if certain time-consuming procedures have been started well in advance, the U.S. Department of State, which administers the J-1 or “Exchange Visitor Program,” can authorize an extension of more than six months. If a J-1 scholar’s initial permission to remain in the United States […]

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Can a visiting scholar receive remuneration?

Yes, if the scholar is in J-1 status. Scholars in J-1 status can be paid by an academic department for whatever work they do in that department. The income is taxable, unless the scholar comes from a country with which the United States has a tax treaty that exempts the scholar’s pay from income taxation. It is also possible for visiting scholars in J-1 status to receive honoraria for lectures or consultations carried out elsewhere than the University, as long as they go through the appropriate procedures. For information about those procedures, contact an adviser in ISSS. Scholars in J-1 […]

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Can a visiting scholar come with a visitor’s visa?

Yes, a visiting scholar can come with what is called a B-1 “visitor for business” visa. Under certain limitations, a person in B-1 status is permitted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) regulations to be reimbursed for expenses, and, under the amended law, can be paid an honorarium in any amount. Visiting scholars who are going to meet all of their own expenses can also come in B-1 status. Acquiring a B-1 visa does not entail any formal immigration document from the University. To obtain a B-1 visa, a prospective scholar ought to have an invitation letter from the […]

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Can one transfer a J-1 visa sponsor?

If you wish to transfer from one J-1 sponsor to another, you must seek clearance from the original program sponsor. Once your program sponsor has approved or signed your new DS-2019 and returned it to the new sponsor, you are then considered under the sponsorship of the new program. The scholar may not take up employment with the new program until the transfer process has been successfully completed. The transfer of J-1 program sponsor must be completed prior to the individual’s termination from the previous J-1 program and before the current DS-2019 form expires. Time spent in a previous program(s) […]

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What is a”DS-2019″?

A DS-2019 is a U.S. government form that a person in another country uses to apply for a J-1 visa to come to the United States as a visiting scholar. The Office of International Student in the sponsoring educational or research institution typically issues DS-2019s on behalf of the university.

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What is the procedure for bringing a visiting foreign scholar to the US?

The prospective scholar must then obtain a “visa” from the United States embassy or a United States consulate in his or her own country. (Citizens and permanent residents of Canada need neither a passport nor a visa to enter the United States.) To obtain a J-1 visa from an American embassy or consular post abroad, the prospective scholar must have a Form DS-2019 from the American institute inviting the scholar.

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Who is a “visiting foreign scholar”?

A visiting foreign scholar is a person who comes to the university temporarily, mainly to teach, do research, or both. The broad term “visiting foreign scholar” encompasses, for example, Fulbright scholars who come to teach, post doctoral research fellows, and visiting professors. Some foreign scholars are at the university for only a few days; others remain for three years. Visiting foreign scholars come to the University for academic enterprises, not for non-academic employment. Visiting foreign scholars normally hold a visa known as a J-1 or exchange-visitor visa. Some people who acquire J-1 status are subject to what is known as […]

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