Immigrant Health Insurance has been a hot topic of debate in Massachusetts. The Patrick Deval-led attempt to introduce universal healthcare for all was met with loud cheers when it was introduced in 2006. The high costs of that plan are now being called into question, as the Massachusetts legislature is facing problems with funding for the plan.

The bone of contention is the fate of nearly 30,000 legal immigrants defined as those legally living in the United States for less than five years, but are yet to become citizens who are more expensive to insure. The governor only managed $40 million from the legislature for this group of immigrants, which is not enough to provide them comprehensive insurance.

Many of those who fall under the definition can receive emergency care, similar to that offered by short-term health insurance plans. What is worrying is that the plans do not cover routine care. The Massachusetts experiment has become the focus of attention because its fate is seen as a preview of the national healthcare reform plan’s fate.

One option for those who have received notification of their exclusion from the state health plan could be to look for alternate immigrant health insurance. It is important to always be insured adequately, and not have gaps in coverage.