Without Insurance, Food Allergies Leave Bad Taste

Sometimes, international travel health insurance can leave a bad taste in your mouth. Let’s say your friend is traveling to Korea. Just as she starts to enjoy the strange culinary delights of the country, all goes downhill. While eating her dessert after a heavy dinner, she is hit by a severe allergic reaction that requires her to be hospitalized. She didn’t know about her allergy, but her international travel health insurance plan does not reimburse her. As a result, she has sworn off travel insurance. Her only complaint is that she had bought insurance for precisely such a situation and […]

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Insurance Jungle: Conditions Regarding Pre-Existing Conditions

Whether you’re buying international student health insurance or visitor medical insurance, the insurance company will have some restrictions on medical conditions that the applicant already suffers from. However, it is important to understand the wording of such exclusions, as it might mean a difference between getting your claim approved and not. One visitors’ health policy may define a pre-existing condition as a condition that ‘would have caused a person to seek medical advice, or for which the applicant sought medical advice during the 36 months prior to the Effective Date of Coverage of the Policy.’ Another visitors’ health insurance plan […]

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What does it mean to have the Pre-Existing Conditions waived if insurance purchased within ‘x’ days from First Trip Payment?

This means you will have coverage for a pre-existing condition if you need to cancel/interrupt your trip. You get this by purchasing the policy within ‘x’ days the company requires (this varies for different companies), after the first payment towards your trip is made.

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What if I take medication for high blood pressure, for example? Would this be considered a Pre-Existing Medical Condition?

If your medication is controlled and you see a Doctor for routine checkups, this would not be considered a pre-existing condition. It would only be considered a pre-existing condition if your Doctor altered your medication, had a test done, requested that a test be done, or changed your diagnosis.

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