I am a J1 scholar and my health insurance is being paid by the Sponsoring organization. Can I purchase a health plan for my dependants?

Both J1 and J2 visa holders must possess valid qualified health insurance during their stay in the US. If your J1 health insurance is paid by your sponsoring organization you can purchase health insurance for your J2 dependants. There are some J1/J2 visa health insurance plans that require the J1 visa holder to purchase coverage. You can select from other J1/J2 plans that does not have this requirement and purchase coverage for your dependants alone.

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J1 Group Insurance

J1 sponsoring organizations can purchase J1 health insurance for the J1 visa holders coming to the US. They must make sure the plan they purchase meet the J1 visa requirements. These plans offer coverage at a reasonable cost of around $40 a month per person. A group J1 insurance plan is easy to administer and convenient for the sponsoring organization. A single application form can offer coverage for multiple groups coming to the US at various times of the year. Each group can be invoiced separaterly. Individual confirmations are available for each J1 member.

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Can a visiting scholar receive remuneration?

Yes, if the scholar is in J-1 status. Scholars in J-1 status can be paid by an academic department for whatever work they do in that department. The income is taxable, unless the scholar comes from a country with which the United States has a tax treaty that exempts the scholar’s pay from income taxation. It is also possible for visiting scholars in J-1 status to receive honoraria for lectures or consultations carried out elsewhere than the University, as long as they go through the appropriate procedures. For information about those procedures, contact an adviser in ISSS. Scholars in J-1 […]

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Can one transfer a J-1 visa sponsor?

If you wish to transfer from one J-1 sponsor to another, you must seek clearance from the original program sponsor. Once your program sponsor has approved or signed your new DS-2019 and returned it to the new sponsor, you are then considered under the sponsorship of the new program. The scholar may not take up employment with the new program until the transfer process has been successfully completed. The transfer of J-1 program sponsor must be completed prior to the individual’s termination from the previous J-1 program and before the current DS-2019 form expires. Time spent in a previous program(s) […]

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What is a”DS-2019″?

A DS-2019 is a U.S. government form that a person in another country uses to apply for a J-1 visa to come to the United States as a visiting scholar. The Office of International Student in the sponsoring educational or research institution typically issues DS-2019s on behalf of the university.

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What is the procedure for bringing a visiting foreign scholar to the US?

The prospective scholar must then obtain a “visa” from the United States embassy or a United States consulate in his or her own country. (Citizens and permanent residents of Canada need neither a passport nor a visa to enter the United States.) To obtain a J-1 visa from an American embassy or consular post abroad, the prospective scholar must have a Form DS-2019 from the American institute inviting the scholar.

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Who is a “visiting foreign scholar”?

A visiting foreign scholar is a person who comes to the university temporarily, mainly to teach, do research, or both. The broad term “visiting foreign scholar” encompasses, for example, Fulbright scholars who come to teach, post doctoral research fellows, and visiting professors. Some foreign scholars are at the university for only a few days; others remain for three years. Visiting foreign scholars come to the University for academic enterprises, not for non-academic employment. Visiting foreign scholars normally hold a visa known as a J-1 or exchange-visitor visa. Some people who acquire J-1 status are subject to what is known as […]

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What are the insurance requirements specified by the department of state to maintain the J1 or J2 visa status?

The Department of State has established the following requirements for the type and amounts of coverage required to maintain J-1 or J-2 status: J1 Scholar (Exchange Visitor Visa) Health Insurance policy must provide “medical benefits of at least $50,000 for each accident or illness.” It means that an acceptable policy couldn’t set a maximum lower than $50,000 in benefits for each accident or illness. If a J visa holder dies in the U.S., then the policy must provide at least $7,500 in repatriation benefits to send the remains to the home country for burial. The deductible should not exceed $500 […]

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What is a J-1 visa?

A J-1 visa is a stamp in a person’s passport, required (except in the case of Canadians) for people who are not U.S. citizens or permanent residents to enter the United States. The J-1 visa is intended for, among others, scholars who want to come to the US temporarily to teach in a college or university, do research, or both.

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